The message needs to be clear at 30 feet.

Even though floor space costs are at all-time highs, the elements you need to exhibit have been reduced dramatically since the dawn of the digital age. A full color booth that once cost in excess of $12,000 to produce can now cost less than half that amount. Not only did the costs get lowered but so did the weight. Aluminum skeletons and printed wraps make the haul to the show lighter and the set-up quicker.

So now that you’ve saved a bundle, don’t skimp on the visuals that will be needed to attract attention at the show. Competition is stiff and those who visually stimulate an attendee from 30 feet away will have a better chance at making new connections and landing a new business. The high school science fair is not the look you want!

The smart business owner knows this along with their marketing person, sales manager and the business development executive. Make sure your photographer knows it too. It will take more than someone with great gear. It takes vision and the ability to share, conceptualize and execute that vision. It takes a pro with experience.

The Javitz Center in New York City along with the Las Vegas Convention Center are two of the largest venues for trade shows. People come from all over the planet for shows at these locations. It’s time for you to make an impression.

Here’s an example of a recent booth design that was a collaboration between Grant Marketing and myself. The Javitz Center was the first venue where it would be used. The goal was to attract attention visually as well as tell the story of what they do in one very large image.

Prior to the shoot a site survey was completed to assess the possibilities. Listening to the client is crucial but it’s also a two- way street. They need to listen to you visually. A great client understands and expects this.

At the completion of the survey, it was agreed that only one image was going to achieve the goals set forth by the client. The robotic spray arm in all its glory!

My concept was explained and agreed upon within minutes. This was the shot. The shot that they needed to attract attention. One that would catch your eye, tell a story and lure the show-walker over for a conversation.

In total, six lights were used with three different color temperatures and the camera color balanced for the main spray arm. Quite a complex set-up. The background was made from new air filters that were white and pristine. A blue gel was added to the 2 lights that illuminated them. The actual spray was added in post-production. Atomized paint and cameras have never had a very good relationship.

The next time you’re planning trade show booth development, make sure you get the right photographer to bring your vision to life. ©2017 Wayne Dion / Dion & Company